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About Lisbon
Though several centuries have passed since the ships that explored the New World and rounded the tip of Africa sailed by Lisbon's majestic and heroically proportioned Belem Tower, this city of 545,000 on Portugal's Tagus River remains a major crossroads of world culture. Today, however, it hosts people who arrive by jet aircraft and, as one of Europe's fastest growing financial centers, conduct electronic trade. Its character and charms, however, have been mostly preserved even in the modern era and, in famed districts like the Alfama, Bairro Alto, Baixa, and Estrela neighborhoods, sightseers are still treated to the beauty of a mixture of Moorish, Gothic, Baroque, and Manueline architecture. Though reflected in the numerous basilicas and smaller churches for which Lisbon is also famous, this aesthetic sensibility defines a multitude of large and small private residences that exist both within Lisbon proper and throughout its extended metropolitan area of 3 million. As the tenth wealthiest urban center in Europe, the city also sports a diverse cultural and social scene that is known for supporting local and world cuisines, entertainment venues, and museums that house contemporary and historic treasures. With a per capita income level that is 40% greater than the European Union average, Lisbon's small business community continues, despite the continent's other financial difficulties, to thrive, enabling both seasonal and permanent residents to enjoy the diverse options that are associated with upscale shopping. As the city boasts a major airport, highways, and is soon to be connected to Spain by high speed rail, it even offers anyone who chooses to call it home easy access to all of Europe.

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  • Though several centuries have passed since the ships that explored the New World and rounded the tip of Africa sailed by Lisbon's majestic and heroically proportioned Belem Tower, this city of 545,000 on Portugal's Tagus River remains a major crossroads of world culture. Today, however, it hosts people who arrive by jet aircraft and, as one of Europe's fastest growing financial centers, conduct electronic trade. Its character and charms, however, have been mostly preserved even in the modern era and, in famed districts like the Alfama, Bairro Alto, Baixa, and Estrela neighborhoods, sightseers are still treated to the beauty of a mixture of Moorish, Gothic, Baroque, and Manueline architecture. Though reflected in the numerous basilicas and smaller churches for which Lisbon is also famous, this aesthetic sensibility defines a multitude of large and small private residences that exist both within Lisbon proper and throughout its extended metropolitan area of 3 million. As the tenth wealthiest urban center in Europe, the city also sports a diverse cultural and social scene that is known for supporting local and world cuisines, entertainment venues, and museums that house contemporary and historic treasures. With a per capita income level that is 40% greater than the European Union average, Lisbon's small business community continues, despite the continent's other financial difficulties, to thrive, enabling both seasonal and permanent residents to enjoy the diverse options that are associated with upscale shopping. As the city boasts a major airport, highways, and is soon to be connected to Spain by high speed rail, it even offers anyone who chooses to call it home easy access to all of Europe.